Content tagged: physical support for social situations

Friday sessioncopy

Content type: Project
Date added: 15.05.2013

On the Relational in Architecture

A round of presentations and discussion followed by a book launch, accompanied by drinks. With Rochus Urban Hinkel, from Urban Interior, a research group at the School of Architecture, 
RMIT University, Melbourne, Dr Hélène Frichot from Architecture + Philosophy, Marianne Mueller, Concrete Geometries Research Cluster, Architectural Association School of Architecture. And the presentation of the “Urban Interior – informal explorations, interventions and occupations” book, 
edited by Rochus Urban Hinkel.
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Friday, 17.6.2011, 18.30h
public works, 1-5 Vyner Street, London E2 9DG

Oase 88copy

Content type: Project
Date added: 15.05.2013

The Exhibition as Social Ground

For the practice of architecture, the format of the exhibition provides a rare opportunity. Besides functional and statutory requirements, with minimal means and an audience to play with, the exhibition provides an interesting site where ideas can be tested one on one. Social ideas especially require testing, as their development is depended on live experiments. The essay focuses on the exhibition ‘The Relational in Architecture’ held by the Concrete Geometries Research Cluster at the Architectural Association in 2012; an event that served a dual purpose: as a space of display, contemplating the relationship between architectural form and social behaviour; and as an actual research space, testing directly how spatial geometry can assist in the production of intersubjective encounters.

OASE 88

Content type: Post
Date added: 06.10.2012

Concrete Geometries article in OASE Journal

The article The Exhibition as Social Ground appears in Oase 88 Exhibitions. Showing and Producing Architecture. The essay reflects on the exhibition ‘The Relational in Architecture’ held by the Concrete Geometries Research Cluster at the Architectural Association in 2012. OASE 88 examines the role of the architecture exhibition as a site of production. Bridging theory and (…)

59270009thumb

Content type: Project
Date added: 16.09.2012

The Relational in Architecture (exhibition)

This exhibition held by the Concrete Geometries Research Cluster at the Architectural Association in 2012, served a dual purpose: as a space of display, contemplating the relationship between architectural form and social behaviour; and as an actual research space, testing directly how spatial geometry can assist in the production of intersubjective encounters. To explore this, participating artist Fran Cottell developed a site specific intervention that reclaimed the Front Member’s Room as a space of debate and exchange.

Download the Oasis 88 article “The Exhibition as Social Ground” for a full description.

Blackwell-Hutton_1copy

Content type: Project
Date added: 29.07.2012

Dymaxion Sleep

This garden designed for the Jardin de Metis in Quebec, changes the viewer’s fundamental spatial relation to the plants. Whereas in most gardens, visitors walk on a path beside the plants – a primarily visual experience – Dymaxion Sleep rotates this relationship by 90 degrees, so that visitors are suspended horizontally over the garden in a hammock-like structure, placing them in an non-visual olfactory relationship to the aromatic plants they lay above. The project seeks to encourage pleasure and sensuality in the context of the traditional garden festival – a type of public intoxication – and explores how doing that while lying prone with strangers could infringe on the social conventions of garden tourism.

Jane Hutton and Arian Blackwell are a landscape designer and an artist/urbanist/architect based in Canada. Photography: Robert Baronet, Jardins de Métis/Reford Gardens

BARarchitekten-2copy

Content type: Project
Date added: 24.07.2012

Oderberger Strasse 56

This mixed-use building in Berlin uses spatial complexity to encourage social interaction at various levels. Densely packed interlocking living, office and commercial units create a socially mixed community of tenants and owner-occupiers sharing one single staircase. The building acts as a place of social exchange and contact. Internally, the sectionally highly articulated units offer open living and work fields, organised as three-dimensional zones rather than closed rooms. The unusual spaces challenge processes of inhabitation and communication. A ‘second architecture’ of stairs, ramps, sliding walls and cabinetry initiates their appropriation. Access from half-landings allows for small units to be split from the main apartment, accommodating the changing circumstances of its inhabitants.
BAR Berlin (Base for Architecture and Research) is an architecture and research practice based in Berlin. Photography: Jan Bitter

KaiSchiemenz-5copy

Content type: Project
Date added: 24.07.2012

Communal Cinema within the Rings of Splendor

This walk-in-sculpture for the Pori Art Museum in Finland contained a video archive showing Finnish films from the Pori region. The raised open structure created an integrative situation in which the visitors could be observed observing. While traditional cinema architecture hides the viewers from one another through their alignment towards the screen, Communal Cinema allowed the opposite: the circular plan arrangement and encompassing screen prompted viewers to observe each other and interact while watching a film. The lack of enclosure encouraged the distant participation of other gallery visitors. Kai Schiemenz is a German artist living an working in Berlin and New York. Photography: Erkki Valli-Jaakola

SusanneHofmann-5copy

Content type: Project
Date added: 24.07.2012

Silver Dragon World

These architectural interventions into the existing spaces of a school in Berlin aim to provide experientially engaging spaces. Assuming that sensory experience is crucial to stimulate emotional identification and positive behavioural responses, the spaces were developed through a collaborative design approach involving users, client and architect. The children’s fantastical worlds triggered new environments such as the ‘Kaleidoscope Gallery’: a gallery of mirrors optically dissolving the geometrical space of the hallway or ‘Fire Wings’, horizontal and sloped surfaces on which the children can lie down, sit or slide. The interventions activated communication, encouraged pupils to overcome language barriers and became a social catalyst in a socially disadvantaged neighbourhood.
Susanne Hofmann is funder of Baupiloten, an experimental architectural studio bridging education, practice and research. Photography: Jan Bitter.



Content type: Post
Date added: 11.06.2011

Friday Session 46

‘On the Relational in Architecture’ Friday, 17.6.2011 6.30h @ public works, 1-5 Vyner Street, London E2 9DG A round of presentations and discussion followed by a book launch, accompanied by drinks. With Rochus Urban Hinkel, from Urban Interior, a research group at the School of Architecture, 
RMIT University, Melbourne, Dr Hélène Frichot from Architecture + (…)