Content tagged: creating modes of sociabilities

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Content type: Project
Date added: 15.05.2013

Rethinking the Social in Architecture

Marianne Mueller and Fran Cottell talked about how spaces, their shape and configuration affects people’s social behaviour at ‘Rethinking the Social in Architecture’, a research symposium by ‘Architecture in Effect’ at Umea University in Sweden. The projects they presented experiment with the ‘social’ in the form of shared experiences and create modes of sociability through the micro-articulation of spatial form at the people scale.
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6.-8. Febuary 2013
Umea School of Architecture, Umea, Sweden

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Content type: Project
Date added: 15.05.2013

The Exhibition as Social Ground

For the practice of architecture, the format of the exhibition provides a rare opportunity. Besides functional and statutory requirements, with minimal means and an audience to play with, the exhibition provides an interesting site where ideas can be tested one on one. Social ideas especially require testing, as their development is depended on live experiments. The essay focuses on the exhibition ‘The Relational in Architecture’ held by the Concrete Geometries Research Cluster at the Architectural Association in 2012; an event that served a dual purpose: as a space of display, contemplating the relationship between architectural form and social behaviour; and as an actual research space, testing directly how spatial geometry can assist in the production of intersubjective encounters.

OASE 88

Content type: Post
Date added: 06.10.2012

Concrete Geometries article in OASE Journal

The article The Exhibition as Social Ground appears in Oase 88 Exhibitions. Showing and Producing Architecture. The essay reflects on the exhibition ‘The Relational in Architecture’ held by the Concrete Geometries Research Cluster at the Architectural Association in 2012. OASE 88 examines the role of the architecture exhibition as a site of production. Bridging theory and (…)

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Content type: Project
Date added: 16.09.2012

The Relational in Architecture (exhibition)

This exhibition held by the Concrete Geometries Research Cluster at the Architectural Association in 2012, served a dual purpose: as a space of display, contemplating the relationship between architectural form and social behaviour; and as an actual research space, testing directly how spatial geometry can assist in the production of intersubjective encounters. To explore this, participating artist Fran Cottell developed a site specific intervention that reclaimed the Front Member’s Room as a space of debate and exchange.

Download the Oasis 88 article “The Exhibition as Social Ground” for a full description.

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Content type: Project
Date added: 29.07.2012

Dymaxion Sleep

This garden designed for the Jardin de Metis in Quebec, changes the viewer’s fundamental spatial relation to the plants. Whereas in most gardens, visitors walk on a path beside the plants – a primarily visual experience – Dymaxion Sleep rotates this relationship by 90 degrees, so that visitors are suspended horizontally over the garden in a hammock-like structure, placing them in an non-visual olfactory relationship to the aromatic plants they lay above. The project seeks to encourage pleasure and sensuality in the context of the traditional garden festival – a type of public intoxication – and explores how doing that while lying prone with strangers could infringe on the social conventions of garden tourism.

Jane Hutton and Arian Blackwell are a landscape designer and an artist/urbanist/architect based in Canada. Photography: Robert Baronet, Jardins de Métis/Reford Gardens

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Content type: Project
Date added: 24.07.2012

Familiar Site

The project uses the familiar typology of the garden fence, not to exclude or defend but to enable and announce. In 2009 volunteers from the neighbourhood built a 180m white picket fence around a closed-off demolition site left by a major urban renewal scheme in a working-class neighbourhood of Eindhoven. Replacing the existing construction fence by an enlarged copy of one of the demolished garden fences changed the appearance of both the terrain and the street and turned an anonymous gap into a familiar site. This simple intervention literally returned the space to the neighbourhood. The act of enclosing it, opened it up as temporary neighbourhood park, a new public space for the community.
Vincent Wittenberg is a Dutch designer working with the latent potential of locations.