Content tagged: actor network theory

CraigScott-12copy

Content type: Project
Date added: 27.01.2014

Voussoir Cloud

This site-specific installation of a compressed vault system at the SciArc Gallery, Los Angeles, uses a featherweight sheet material, intentionally confusing structural and material strategies. The project attempts to defamiliarise and create conflicted readings of normative architectural typologies. Voussoirs – wedge-shaped masonry blocks that form an arch – were created by folding paper-thin wood laminate along curved seams. A digital design and fabrication process enabled the exploration of the spatial consequences of mathematical relationships, such as curvature, number, size and relative position of components. The result has a strong sensorial presence: a light, porous surface of luminous wood pieces. Voussoir Cloud manages to engage its viewer on both a cognitive and sensual level. IwamotoScott is a San Francisco based architecture and design practice. Photography: Judson Terry.



Content type: Project
Date added: 29.07.2012

Architecture’s Engagement with the Real

While critical practice suffers from ‘design deficits’ and digital practice remains locked within design processes according, the ‘concerned practice’ could be a possible mode of operation for an architecture concerned with the real. Thinking architecture through the notion of agency, Doucet argues for an ‘idiotic architecture’ and the emergence of unexpected events.

Blackwell-Hutton_1copy

Content type: Project
Date added: 29.07.2012

Dymaxion Sleep

This garden designed for the Jardin de Metis in Quebec, changes the viewer’s fundamental spatial relation to the plants. Whereas in most gardens, visitors walk on a path beside the plants – a primarily visual experience – Dymaxion Sleep rotates this relationship by 90 degrees, so that visitors are suspended horizontally over the garden in a hammock-like structure, placing them in an non-visual olfactory relationship to the aromatic plants they lay above. The project seeks to encourage pleasure and sensuality in the context of the traditional garden festival – a type of public intoxication – and explores how doing that while lying prone with strangers could infringe on the social conventions of garden tourism.

Jane Hutton and Arian Blackwell are a landscape designer and an artist/urbanist/architect based in Canada. Photography: Robert Baronet, Jardins de Métis/Reford Gardens